Food.com

Food.Com

This dish originated in the city of Catania in Sicily, the home of the famous Italian composer Vincenzo Bellini. Although there are conflicting stories exactly how the dish was named and by who, most believe it was in honor of Bellini and his famous opera “Le Norma” composed in 1831. The dish is actually quite simple yet surprisingly deliciously. Pasta is tossed with fresh tomato sauce, seared eggplant and shredded ricotta salata cheese just before serving. Individual flavors are retained and complimented when combined. The fresh sauce is usually traditional, made with olive oil, garlic, onion, fresh peeled or good quality canned tomatoes from Italy, and plenty of fresh basil. My recipe replaces garlic and olive oil with Peter's Garlic Oil; olive oil infused with pot roasted garlic, Tuscany seasoning and a hint of red pepper flakes. It adds terrific complex flavors to the sauce while seasoning the eggplant. Preparation of the eggplant is important. It is peeled and thick sliced lengthwise. The eggplant is then "sweated" with salt to release its dark bitter liquid. If electing to cook the eggplant by sautéing, lightly coat the pan with oil from Peter's Garlic Oil. If oven baking, liberally brush slices with the seasoned olive oil and place on cookie sheets. Brush with enough additional flavored oil to keep the eggplant from drying out. Either way, be careful to remove the eggplant as soon as the slices are cooked through. Please don't overcook. However, my very favorite way is to liberally brush the eggplant with the seasoned oil and grill both sides. Once lightly browned and grill marks appear, brush again with more garlic oil. Lower heat and place eggplant on a sheet of aluminum foil on the grates for final cooking. Grilling really intensifies the flavor of the eggplant. Ricotta Salata is salted cheese made from the whey of sheep's milk. It is the cheese most associated with this dish. Our family was partial to Pecorino Romano, another salty cheese. -- posted by Peter Steriti
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Food Category: FOOD
This dish takes time. It calls for the short ribs to be marinated overnight in a cooked marinade, then braised, and finally finished off under the broiler. So plan at least two days for it. But the result is more than worth it, and you can do all but the final broil up to two days ahead. And at the end, you get tender, intensely flavored, melt-in-your-mouth goodness, with a lacquer-like finish for which your family & guests will thank you. It's a show-stopper & I add my congratulations now to those you will undoubtedly receive. Mazel tov! -- posted by Soma Sengupta
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Food Category: FOOD
Really good for lunch or large crowds -- posted by Simple Meals
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Food Category: FOOD
Really good meatballs 11/10 would recommend -- posted by Simple Meals
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Food Category: FOOD
Good for breakfast or a late night snack! -- posted by Simple Meals
Tue, Mar 28, 2017
Source: Food Category: FOOD
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